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Plain Weave That's Not So Plain: Pinwheel, Checkered, Log Cabin

Monday October 19, 2009

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You can achieve a lot with color and texture on your rigid heddle loom. Here are a few examples of what you do with just colors.

Pinwheel:

Warp 2 dark, 2 light. Weave: Tromp as writ (weft same as warp).

Tromp as writ%3A Weft same as warp.

Checkered:

Warp 4 dark, 4 light. Weave: Tromp as writ (weft same as warp). 

Tromp as writ - Weft same as warp.

Log Cabin:

See draft for colors. Weave: Tromp as writ (weft same as warp).

Tromp as writ%3A Weft same as warp.

Joyce

Filed under categories: Designs, HowTo's, Projects

27 comments so far… Has this helped you?

Rob Toth says:

Do you know how to set up a Rigid Heddle for a Checkerboard that you could actually play on? What you call Checkeboard has 3 different squares patterns not 2.

Posted: Tuesday August 30, 2011


Joyce says:

Here’s a way to do it with 4 shafts…this is where you’d use string heddles on a rod if you don’t have a floor loom. In this case use the “Lift Plan” of the draft.

http://handweaving.net/PatternDisplay.aspx?PATTERNID=61535

String Heddles on a stick: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptf-Y8cZhB8

Posted: Friday September 2, 2011


Joyce says:

I wasn’t aware that checkerboard meant only 2 colors. I thought it was also used to describe a design/layout (as in definition #2 of the word at dictionary.com). If checkerboard is not the correct name for that draft, let me know and I’ll try to think of something else to call it.

If you don’t want to use string heddles, I’m thinking you could use pick up sticks to weave blocks of floats and throw in some tabby with a thinner thread to hold it all together, just like what is done with overshot.

Posted: Friday September 2, 2011


rain says:

Joyce your checkerboard pattern….. does it come out more monochromatic plaid-like?

Posted: Tuesday October 4, 2011


Joyce says:

@rain I should probably change the name to “Checkered”. Plaid is tromp as writ, yes, but I wouldn’t necessarily put this in the plaid category.

It’s more like the way a checkered tablecloth turns out http://static5.depositphotos.com/1011833/531/i/950/depositphotos_5312745-Red-checked-fabric-tablecloth.jpg

Posted: Wednesday October 5, 2011


rain says:

reminds me of a country kitchen table cloth. looks great!

Posted: Tuesday December 20, 2011


Linda says:

regid heddle patterns are hard to find. I’m going to try this checkered pattern thanks

Posted: Tuesday January 17, 2012


Joyce says:

@Linda

Hope we get to see a picture of it at the group page on Facebook! ;D

Rigid heddle patterns are usually done with color combinations or pick up sticks or double weaving. Try those search terms. You can always check out my Designs section where I have a few things like waffle weave and pile loop instructions as well.

Thanks for writing and you’re very much welcome!

Posted: Tuesday January 17, 2012


Virginia says:

Thanks, keep trying to do double weave
with only one reed, thought I saw a pattern but cannot find it now. Is there such a thing by
using pickup sticks???

Posted: Monday January 30, 2012


Joyce says:

@Virginia You could do it with a reed, a set of string heddles on a rod and then 2 pick up sticks. The idea for double weaving is that you need to make 4 different sheds. Here’s the direct link to the double weave article http://rigidheddleweaving.com/articles/how-to-double-weave

If you need to find anything else, please use the search boxes located either to the lower left or the upper right. If you still can’t find something here, drop me a line and I’ll do my best to help you find what you need/want to know.

Posted: Monday January 30, 2012


Barbara R. says:

How can this pattern be converted to rigid heddle looms?

I would like to give it a try!

http://weavezine.com/projects/honeycomb-spot-bronson-two-shafts

Posted: Saturday June 2, 2012


Joyce says:

You’ll need to use a pick up stick or heddle rod (string heddles on a stick) to achieve the floats needed for that draft. That is a 3 shaft draft and not plain weave.

Posted: Saturday June 2, 2012


Barbara R. says:

As I am a rank amature and am still learning…how do I know what threads to pick up and…..Oh boy. I don’t even know where to begin to convert this to something I can do.

Oh well…I guess I will try something else. I don’t want a floor loom.

I saw this being done on a rigid heddle but could not figure out what the woman was doing.

Posted: Saturday June 2, 2012


Barbara R. says:

Here is what I saw..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fce81CIu82Y

Maybe I was wrong. Maybe it is not spot lace or bronson lace?

I don’t know anymore…..

Posted: Saturday June 2, 2012


Joyce says:

Barbara,

Check out my articles about how to use a pick up stick and how to read a weaving draft.

Please don’t overwhelm yourself. There’s a lot to learn in weaving. Learn the basics first (plain weave achieving effects with color as in the article above) and get good at that first. Then move on to pick up sticks and then multiple shaft weaving (which is what you’re asking about).

I strongly recommend you go to my Amazon store and get a copy of Betty Linn Davenports Books or anything by Jane Patrick.

You don’t need a floor loom to do mutli-shaft weaving. Anything that holds warps under tension is a loom. You can achieve sheds in many different ways. You can certainly do 3 shaft weaving on the RH using string heddles on a rod (see my videos and check out Laverne Waddington—-master backstrap weaver). You can apply concepts from one loom to any other loom, since, remember, anything that holds warps under tension is a loom. ;)

Posted: Sunday June 3, 2012


Joyce says:

Also, please join us on Facebook! We have a group there with currently 278 members ready to help you (see the big blue F button with the little people icon at the upper left of the page). There is also ravelry.com and weavolution.com, both excellent fiber arts pages with tons of helpful people.

For doing the lace which requires pick up, you would need a lesson on pick up control, which you can find on this web site if you search for the term in the search box upper right.

What helps me is to think of it in terms that whatever thread I want lifted, I have to put the stick under it.

Posted: Sunday June 3, 2012


Barbara R. says:

Thanks Joyce,

I think I will do something less complicated. As far as Facebook is concerned…I don’t really like those sites much. Too gosippy for me. I spend way too much time on line of late anyway. I watch my husband on his hand held AND on his laptop!! I just don’t want to get like that. Thanks for the invite. You have taught me a lot that the lessons I payed to attend did not.

bjr

Posted: Sunday June 3, 2012


Joyce says:

Alrighty. I have found that the Facebook groups are the most non-gossipy things out there. People stay on topic and help each other and I’ve learned so much and have been so inspired by the people there that it’s amazing.

What I can try to do is add instructions for a kind of huck lace on the pick up stick page. Please view the video (I think it’s the second one on the page) that shows pick up control. That’s the main part you’ll need to know. After that it’s just a matter of the sequence of where the stick goes and if the heddle is up or down.

Posted: Sunday June 3, 2012


Barbara R. says:

Joyce,

Just a quick update. Using my own hand dyed, handspun yarn, I am making a scarf for my mother in laws’s new husband using the hounds tooth pattern on this site.

It is BEAUTIFUL!! I am so proud of me and so happy I found this site. Thanks for all your hard work1

Barb R.

Posted: Friday June 15, 2012


Joyce says:

YW and TY Barb. I really wish you could join us on the Facebook group. Really, it’s not gossipy at all and we share and learn so much from each other. I would love to see pictures of what you’ve done and you can easily share them there. ;)

Posted: Tuesday June 19, 2012


Karen says:

Thanks for all your great info. I now live in Ecuador and have started to learn how to weave on the rigid heddle in a local yarn shop. I will be joining your FB group and passing on your info to the other ladies in our weaving workshop.

Posted: Monday August 27, 2012


Barbara R. says:

Had this sent to me today Joyce. What a wonder. Someone asking ME about weaving….?

http://www.weavezine.com/projects/honeycomb-spot-bronson-two-shafts

Don’t quite understand it. If you can simplify it I would appreciate it.

Posted: Tuesday April 23, 2013


Joyce says:

If you don’t know how to read a draft, I have an article here which may help: http://rigidheddleweaving.com/articles/how-to-read-a-weaving-draft-in-plain-english

Floor and table looms have shafts and each shaft has heddles that you can move around. If a person threads that loom with a heddle on shaft one, threads a heddle on shaft 2 and then has a thread go through the loom without a heddle (goes between the heddles), that thread can be treated as if it was on a third shaft.

This same idea may be used on my 4 shaft floor loom so that I can get “5 shafts” out of it. See also: http://rigidheddleweaving.com/articles/how-to-warp-a-floor-loom-front-to-back to see how the heddles are threaded.

Hope that helps!

Posted: Wednesday April 24, 2013


Barbara R. says:

I will pass the infor on Joyce and direct this lady to you here and on Facebook!

You are one amazing lady and I appreciate your help and talent.

Keep going with your wheels. You are bound to be a success!!

bjr

Posted: Tuesday April 30, 2013


Joyce says:

Thanks Barbara!

It’s also how the rigid heddle works. Technically, you have only one shaft. The holes in your RH are the heddles. Threads that pass between the heddles are the “slots”. That’s how you get the second shaft for the 2 sheds created by an RH. Threads that don’t go through a heddle are always in neutral position…they never move.

Posted: Wednesday May 1, 2013


Amanda says:

After successfully getting the granny shrug to work (just need to wash it) I want to get back to trying to get stripes to work on my RH. I’ve seen stripey scarves all over at the craft fairs, but they’ve all been done using at least 4 shaft looms. They weren’t sure how to do it on a RH, do you have any ideas? I’m getting fairly good using pick up sticks with my two reeds now, and I’m thinking that’s what I’ll need to do. I want the stripes to go the length of the scarf, so I know I need to warp the stripes. My earlier attempts didn’t show the stripe though, and I’m not sure why. Please help if you can.

Thanks, Amanda C

Posted: Thursday February 13, 2014


Joyce says:

I would have to see photographs of your earlier attempts to be able to troubleshoot.

Posted: Thursday February 13, 2014


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